Tooth Extractions

Tooth Extractions

A dental extraction is the removal of teeth from the dental Avelous (socket) in the alveolar bone. Extractions are performed for a wide variety of reasons, but most commonly to remove teeth which have become unforeseeable through tooth decay, periodontal disease or dental trauma, especially when they are associated with toothache. Sometimes wisdom teeth are impacted (stuck and unable to grow normally into the mouth) and may cause recurrent infections of the gum (peritonitis). In orthodontics if the teeth are crowded, sound teeth may be extracted (often bicuspids) to create space so the rest of the teeth can be straightened.

Reasons for extracting teeth

Although permanent teeth can last a lifetime, teeth that have become damaged or decayed may need to be removed or extracted.

Other reasons include:

  • A crowded mouth. Sometimes dentists extract teeth to prepare the mouth for orthodontic treatment. The goal of orthodontics is to properly align the teeth, which may not be possible If there is not enough space for the growth of your teeth. Likewise, if a tooth cannot break through the gum (erupt) because there is not room in the mouth for it, your dentist may recommend extraction.
  • Infection. If tooth decay or damage extends to the pulp tooth (containing nerves, arterioles, venules, fibrous tissue and lymphatic tissue), bacteria in the mouth can enter the pulp, leading to infection. If infection is so severe that antibiotics do not cure it, extraction may be needed to prevent the spread of infection.
  • Risk of infection. If your immune system is compromised (for example, if you are receiving chemotherapy or are having an organ transplant) even the risk of infection in a particular tooth may be reason to remove the tooth.
  • Gum disease. If periodontal disease — an infection of the tissues and bones that surround and support the teeth — have caused loosening of the teeth, it may be necessary to extract the tooth or teeth.

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